Age Place News


Keeping you up to date with the latest & greatest home accessibility solutions and ageing in place news.

Age Place News


Keeping you up to date with the latest & greatest home accessibility solutions and ageing in place news.

Latest News

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2 years ago
Age Place

The most important people to help the Age In Place process

Nurse.
A Nurse can provide a pain assessment and assist a person and the primary care giver with identify medication management problems and solutions such as patient education on medication need, dose timing, physical reminders, and medications with fall implications. A Nurse can provide other pain management techniques such as anti-inflammatory medications, distraction, mobility, heat.
A Nurse can implement exercise strategies such as interest in tai chi and other tailored home exercise regimes.
A Nurse can work with a person to identify problems such as social isolation, health needs, and housing-related concerns that feel overwhelming. A Nurse can generate multiple solutions and evaluate the outcome.

Occupational Therapist
An Occupational Therapist can assess homes for safety risks, creates prioritised list for handyman/builders (e.g. install grab rails, fix up stair handrails, widen doorways, install doorway ramps, lower microwaves and kitchen benches, and install tailored bathroom safety equipment).
An Occupational Therapist can assess people in their homes and identifies areas of concern. An Occupational Therapist observes the mobility performance of a person and identifies solutions for priority concerns; orders, installs, and trains participant in the use of adaptive, mobility and rehabilitation aids and devices.
An Occupational Therapist can train a person in fall recovery. Occupational Therapist and Nurses can reinforce strength and balance strategies during each home visit.

Builder
A Builder should work with an Occupational Therapist to install, modify, fix and build from a prioritised list, designed to increase a person’s safety and mobility around the home.
The following information allows a designer/builder to understand how a home can be modified to allow for increased accessibility and mobility.
... See MoreSee Less

The most important people to help the Age In Place process
Nurse.
A Nurse can provide a pain assessment and assist a person and the primary care giver with identify medication management problems and solutions such as patient education on medication need, dose timing, physical reminders, and medications with fall implications.  A Nurse can provide other pain management techniques such as anti-inflammatory medications, distraction, mobility, heat.
A Nurse can implement exercise strategies such as interest in tai chi and other tailored home exercise regimes.
A Nurse can work with a person to identify problems such as social isolation, health needs, and housing-related concerns that feel overwhelming.  A Nurse can generate multiple solutions and evaluate the outcome.
Occupational Therapist
An Occupational Therapist can assess homes for safety risks, creates prioritised list for handyman/builders (e.g. install grab rails, fix up stair handrails, widen doorways, install doorway ramps, lower microwaves and kitchen benches, and install tailored bathroom safety equipment).
An Occupational Therapist can assess people in their homes and identifies areas of concern.  An Occupational Therapist observes the mobility performance of a person and identifies solutions for priority concerns; orders, installs, and trains participant in the use of adaptive, mobility and rehabilitation aids and devices.
An Occupational Therapist can train a person in fall recovery.  Occupational Therapist and Nurses can reinforce strength and balance strategies during each home visit.
Builder
A Builder should work with an Occupational Therapist to install, modify, fix and build from a prioritised list, designed to increase a person’s safety and mobility around the home.
The following information allows a designer/builder to understand how a home can be modified to allow for increased accessibility and mobility.
2 years ago
Age Place

Access Homes Modifications – Training For Builders
The current problem that exists and that will exacerbate in the near future is the lack of training for builders and designer to modify homes of Australia’s ageing population.
It is no secret that our ageing population is increasing rapidly, with baby boomers now reaching the retirement age. In 2012, there were 4.5 million Australians over the age of 60 representing 19.6% of the population and by 2050, this percentage will increase to 28.9% (12 million).
We are entering into a period where enormous strains are already being placed on housing due to the ageing of baby boomers at a level never seen before. There will be many people that will be able to be accommodated in nursing homes; conversely there will be many more that will not be able to. It may be the most financially sensible housing option for those seniors with the physical ability to remain at home.
Currently there is no training or no accreditation course that allows builders to be understand the principles of home modifications to improve accessibility for seniors as they age in place.
The solution to this problem is for builders to undergo a training and accreditation course to undertake home modifications for older adults and people with disabilities.
Elements of the course should incorporate the following:
- An overview of the key access challenges of home owners with disabilities and those who are ageing;
- Information regarding the key elements to consider in home modifications for access upgrade including: entry ramps, stairs, handrails, doorways, turning areas, living room, kitchen, bathroom, laundry, bedroom, surfaces, slip resistance, & electricals.
- When to obtain expert advice from specialists such as Occupation Therapists with regards to bathroom and kitchen modification
The benefits will be to instil a basic level of understanding of responsibilities, obligations and ethics in how to provide and deal with home modification services to older adults.
This will have the flow on effect of not only minimizing possible unprofessional practices with one of the frailer sectors of the population, but also transforming a house into a safe, attractive, and comfortable home for life.
The maturing of the Australian Baby Boomer population is a huge opportunity for home builders. As this consumer group expands, more and more opportunities will open up for builders and designers whom are knowledgeable in home modifications.
... See MoreSee Less

Access Homes Modifications – Training For Builders
The current problem that exists and that will exacerbate in the near future is the lack of training for builders and designer to modify homes of Australia’s ageing population. 
It is no secret that our ageing population is increasing rapidly, with baby boomers now reaching the retirement age.  In 2012, there were 4.5 million Australians over the age of 60 representing 19.6% of the population and by 2050, this percentage will increase to 28.9% (12 million). 
We are entering into a period where enormous strains are already being placed on housing due to the ageing of baby boomers at a level never seen before.  There will be many people that will be able to be accommodated in nursing homes; conversely there will be many more that will not be able to.  It may be the most financially sensible housing option for those seniors with the physical ability to remain at home.
Currently there is no training or no accreditation course that allows builders to be understand the principles of home modifications to improve accessibility for seniors as they age in place.
The solution to this problem is for builders to undergo a training and accreditation course to undertake home modifications for older adults and people with disabilities.
Elements of the course should incorporate the following: 
- An overview of the key access challenges of home owners with disabilities and those who are ageing; 
- Information regarding the key elements to consider in home modifications for access upgrade including: entry ramps, stairs, handrails, doorways, turning areas, living room, kitchen, bathroom, laundry, bedroom, surfaces, slip resistance, & electricals.
- When to obtain expert advice from specialists such as Occupation Therapists with regards to bathroom and kitchen modification
The benefits will be to instil a basic level of understanding of responsibilities, obligations and ethics in how to provide and deal with home modification services to older adults. 
This will have the flow on effect of not only minimizing possible unprofessional practices with one of the frailer sectors of the population, but also transforming a house into a safe, attractive, and comfortable home for life.
The maturing of the Australian Baby Boomer population is a huge opportunity for home builders.  As this consumer group expands, more and more opportunities will open up for builders and designers whom are knowledgeable in home modifications.
2 years ago
Age Place

Longevity seems to be an aspiration of the young and paradoxically, for many, being elderly is an almost forgotten consequence of achieving that aspiration.

With Baby Boomers now reaching the retirement age an ever increasing percentage of the population is becoming directly and indirectly affected by having to consider the best options to maintain a good quality of life for ourselves or our parents in our more mature years.

In 2012 there were 4.5 million Australians over the age of 60, representing 19.6% of the population and by 2050 this percentage will have increased to 28.9%.
Surveys and statistics in the USA have identified that 90% of adults over the age of 65 report that they would prefer to stay in their current residence as they age and one third of American Households are home to one or more residents 60 years of age or older.

The demographic makeup and the impact of the GFC in the US are likely to be responsible for a higher proportion of multigenerational homes than presently exists in Australia, but the issue of an increasing number of the population being of retirement age and the vast majority preferring to remain in their own home is as relevant in Australia as it is for most of the Western world.

There are many reasons for people wishing to remain in their own home in later years. Apart from financial benefits, to the individuals and the community at large, which are often overlooked, the psychological and general health benefits of ageing in familiar surroundings are well documented. However, the aspired enjoyment and quality of life can be severely undermined or destroyed by risks and handicaps that, with appropriate information, can be avoided or mitigated.

As we age problems arise from,
• General motor functioning deterioration – Statistically, 32% of those over the age of 65 will have some difficulty walking, which will require the use of a cane, walking frame or wheelchair. For those with this mobility issue many existing homes present obstacles and problems. Home modifications, such as door width and passage widening, addition of handrails, the alteration of the heights of sinks and toilets and stair lifts, can ameliorate the difficulties that arise as a consequence of these handicaps and considerable improve the physical and emotional quality of life. Anxiety and depression affect many older people and feeling safe and able to lead life as hazard free as possible makes a difference.

• Fine motor functioning also reduces for many as we age and can cause difficulties with moving fingers impacting on many basic activities that we take for granted in our younger years. Modifications of handles on doors and bathroom and kitchen modifications will remove many of the difficulties that can arise from this reduced function. There are also specially designed cups and other utensils that are available.

• The five senses and cognitive capabilities tend to reduce as we age with slower response time, hearing limitations and visual impairment, with consequential dangers including fire hazards. There many options available to overcome or minimise the problems that arise.

To respond to these and other challenges that can arise as we age there is a range of services available.

The www.ageplace.com.au website, provides information and links so that you or your parents can plan to live the rest of your/their days in a comfortable, familiar environment, in a cherished neighbourhood and with an enduring sense of wellbeing and self-worth.
... See MoreSee Less

Longevity seems to be an aspiration of the young and paradoxically, for many, being elderly is an almost forgotten consequence of achieving that aspiration.
With Baby Boomers now reaching the retirement age an ever increasing percentage of the population is becoming directly and indirectly affected by having to consider the best options to maintain a good quality of life for ourselves or our parents in our more mature years.
In 2012 there were 4.5 million Australians over the age of 60, representing 19.6% of the population and by 2050 this percentage will have increased to 28.9%.
Surveys and statistics in the USA have identified that 90% of adults over the age of 65 report that they would prefer to stay in their current residence as they age and one third of American Households are home to one or more residents 60 years of age or older.
The demographic makeup and the impact of the GFC in the US are likely to be responsible for a higher proportion of multigenerational homes than presently exists in Australia, but the issue of an increasing number of the population being of retirement age and the vast majority preferring to remain in their own home is as relevant in Australia as it is for most of the Western world.
There are many reasons for people wishing to remain in their own home in later years. Apart from financial benefits, to the individuals and the community at large, which are often overlooked, the psychological and general health benefits of ageing in familiar surroundings are well documented. However, the aspired enjoyment and quality of life can be severely undermined or destroyed by risks and handicaps that, with appropriate information, can be avoided or mitigated.
As we age problems arise from,
• General motor functioning deterioration – Statistically, 32%  of those over the age of 65 will have some difficulty walking, which will require the use of a cane, walking frame or wheelchair. For those with this mobility issue many existing homes present obstacles and problems. Home modifications, such as door width and passage widening, addition of handrails, the alteration of the heights of sinks and toilets and stair lifts, can ameliorate the difficulties that arise as a consequence of these handicaps and considerable improve the physical and emotional quality of life. Anxiety and depression affect many older people and feeling safe and able to lead life as hazard free as possible makes a difference.
• Fine motor functioning also reduces for many as we age and can cause difficulties with moving fingers impacting on many basic activities that we take for granted in our younger years. Modifications of handles on doors and bathroom and kitchen modifications will remove many of the difficulties that can arise from this reduced function. There are also specially designed cups and other utensils that are available.
• The five senses and cognitive capabilities tend to reduce as we age with slower response time, hearing limitations and visual impairment, with consequential dangers including fire hazards. There many options available to overcome or minimise the problems that arise.
To respond to these and other challenges that can arise as we age there is a range of services available.
The www.ageplace.com.au website, provides information and links so that you or your parents can plan to live the rest of your/their days in a comfortable, familiar environment, in a cherished neighbourhood and with an enduring sense of wellbeing and self-worth.